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13.8.15

How I Mastered Covering Up My Hereditary Dark Under Eye Circles

I didn't. But making them look more subtle, now that's my game. If it were as easy as smearing on a peach coloured concealer, we would all be masters. But alas, it's not actually that easy. Especially when it comes to hereditary dark under eye circles. Oh yes, those glorious genetic markers that will have the world believing that you're either heavily sleep deprived, sick, dying or, as my mother so delicately puts it, "looks like you're on drugs." Thanks, mum. Funny considering, you know, I inherited these from you.
Those perfectly imperfect flaws that are forever creating shadows below your eyes, only to get worse when you, actually, are tired. Am I sleepy or is this just my face? The upside is that no one will know you're sleepy because that's just how you normally look.
While the world may tell you to be proud of them, they don't look that great. To be honest, they may even scare people off by giving them a false representation of you - sick and dying anyone? And no one wants to rock up to work, an interview, an important meeting with bags that stick out a mile. And thus, we conceal (don't feel) and try to not let them show. But no matter what you do, it just doesn't work. They'll still be there only (if you're lucky) look more subtle. 

The road to mastering my dark, under eye circles, was hindered by my pale skin. You see, peach concealer does not help the fair complexion. It just creates an obvious tonal difference. It darkens the area with orange. Especially when you need so damn much of the stuff just to cover it up.
Dark circles - 1
Me - nil.
I decided that I'd need a product that will do more with a smaller amount. Possibly something brightening to counteract the darkness. 
I then discovered a method that muted my purple discolouring. Throughout my trial and errors of packing on the product, I had learned that less is, in fact, more. 
The only thing left was to ditch that peach concealer. Always stick to one that matches your skin tone.

When it comes to hereditary circles, the traditional methods won't do us much good. There's no difference between using specialised products and just any old concealer. The only trick is to find a full coverage product. Liquid and cream work best. 
So, I picked up my holy grail Maybelline concealer and was on my way to mastering my technique. 

How did I do it?
I swiped on my Fair Clair under my eyes and blended that stuff out like my life depended on it.
Result: eh, it was looking much better but that alone won't do the trick.
Proceeding to the rest of my face, I began to apply my powder foundation making sure not to skip under those eyes.
And then, because that's never enough, on went one more swipe of the concealer.
Result: brightening and much better.
To finish, one final dusting of the foundation powder to set and add a little more coverage. 
Result: That's better!
Dark circles - 0
Me - all the success.

While those circles aren't invisible, they are muted, much more subtle, making me look just a little sleepy. They may never be invisible to be honest. 
You may be thinking, "why not use a liquid full coverage foundation? That will help out even more."
To which I say, you are correct. But as a pale lady one cannot find such a thing in my skin tone and thus, foundation powder is where it's at. 
On the upside, powder works too. 

However, with this technique, those dark circles look more subtle and somewhat natural.
And that, is how I mastered covering up my hereditary dark under eye circles. (But didn't really.)


Photo by Sheree Grace

- Sheree

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Any and all posts that are sponsored or include gifted items will be identified in each post with an individual disclaimer at the bottom of the post stating the nature of it (as either sponsored or gifted.)
All photos are taken by ©Sheree Grace for Kindly, Sheree unless stated otherwise. Posts will always have an indication at the bottom verifying photo credits if sourced elsewhere. Photos by Sheree Grace are not to be taken or used without permission and must be credited with a link if given.